Top Ten Art 15 Pieces You Wish You’d Thought Of First

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Our Ikran, counts down the top 10 pieces from Art 15 that you wish you thought of, but didn’t. 

1. The waves crashing are the first thing you could hear from a distance. A true master piece by Jenna Burchell. ‘Homing’ is an interactive installation, with a simple touch, to ‘play’ the sounds of home. It was quite a unique experience to touch a copper string and then suddenly with a single touch being able to hear the sound of a rolling waves, laughter, and conversations so noticeably; you could almost be in those moments.

Watch the piece here; https://vimeo.com/10877590

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2. Ever wondered what it would be like to create a rotating clock with arms that spell out the time like a digital display? Humans since 1982, a Stockholm studio presents an installation of 90 clocks that are constantly shifting through monochrome patterns, lettering and numbers and it did all the above. The piece will have you feeling a little woozy yet blown away by its technique. It was like a hypnotising ritual.

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3. Art 15 has really outdone itself this year, Noart brings us a piece that screams consumerism. ‘Tax Heaven’ consists of a safe box, zinc varnish with real diamant. Definitely a big ‘I wish I thought of that moment’ with this one (if you have real diamonds and a safe box laying around).

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4. Another magical sound piece that has everyone thinking ‘I wish I thought of that’ is by Sangjin Kim ‘Meditation’ could be heard throughout the fair. The clanging of the Moktak was so rhythmic, repetitive, it was like a never ending alarm. In a good way. Using simply a Moktak, speaker, a sitting mat, and some electronical controls, you just think ‘it’s so simple and fantastic. Why didn’t I think of it?’

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5. You know the saying ‘Drawing is 90 % looking, and 10% doing’, that is something that was pretty evident in the work of Graham Fink at Art 15 this year. He directs his own eye movement, lines appear on the page. He achieves this with the help of software he developed in conjunction with Tobii Technology in China, specifically a Tobii ‘eye-tracker’. Forget brushes, when you can paint with your eyes.

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6. It’s interesting what happens when you wrap Korean parcels and hand dye them in different inks, Kwang Young Chun brings his own history to Art 15. ‘Aggregation’ is made of Polystyrene triangles wrapped in traditional Korean mulberry paper (hanji), his striking textured canvases and monumental organic sculptures have rippling, sensuous exteriors that evoke the surface of the moon.

These hand dyed, and hand placed works use the most humble of materials formed breath-taking compositions, which transcend their constituent elements and evoke universal aspects of the human condition.

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7. Humming birds are a fantastic creature, but have you ever seen an installation of moving humming birds without hearing any sounds? The riflemaker presented the work of Juan Fountanive, you could call him a filmmaker but his style is a little more analog. In Fontanive’s work, film is card stock and playback comes in the form of rapidly flipping pages inside metal boxes. You can see the gears moving as his hand-painted pages flip over and over in a hypnotizing cadence. These are such a clever piece of art, flipbooks are such a simple yet fresh idea. Bet you wish you did it first.

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8. I don’t really have much to say about this piece by Mark Davey ‘Master and Slave’ because it is so simple, so romantic, so ‘I wish I thought of that’. It’s just so…simple and frustratingly great. The piece is a sculpture consisting of a metal bar is thrust towards a hanging bulb, stopping with precision just as it kisses the glass – the light brightest at this moment only to fade as the bar falls back away. There is an incapability to it’s mechanical action; we want the bar to smash through the bulb, we want the arm to push the tube-light slightly further so it dashes to the floor. We want a climax. We get none of that. Just a back and forth kiss.

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9. Heard of Tinder? Ever thought why not create a piece of work from these interactions? Phoebe Boswell has. She uses such a humorous yet serious approach to conversations that happened when a woman wanted to meet people in a place she didn’t know much about, and meeting other people in the place. ‘My stranger in the village’ consists of small sketches of display photos the people she would speak to had, and bubble like texts of the weird yet funny moments that occurred. These wonderful sketches bring drawing to life and highlights what occurs when people read things the wrong way on social media, especially Tinder.

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10. Last, but not least, this beauty by Hossein Edalatkhah, ‘Breathing money’. It’s so freaking beautiful, it’s made of a silicon PVC gas mask and Swarovski crystal diamonds. I mean, wow. If things go badly, at least you’d look fashionable. It’s something that is worn in such a difficult moment, but in a moment it becomes this object you simply just want to have because it looks enticing. Don’t you wish you thought of it first?

@MiakiliAiko